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CNA Training: CNA Duties

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver CNA Pay, CNA Job, CNA School, Working as Caregiver CNA.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Ruby and I’m one of the recruiters here at myCNAjobs.

Today’s training session is to help those exploring a career as a certified nursing assistant to better understand what a CNA is, a day in the life of a CNA, and typical CNA job duties.

There’s never been a better time to explore a career in nursing. As a CNA, you’re joining the fastest growing profession in America….meaning job security! You can work anywhere you want in the country and likely find a job.

First, it’s important to understand there are a lot of different names for a CNA depending on your State. Sometimes, companies refer to CNAs as Certified Nursing Assistants, Certified Nursing Aides, Nurse Aides, and sometimes event State Tested Nursing Assistants. Regardless of your state, being a nurse aide is an important job that’s very much in demand.

So, let’s dive in.  Today we’re going to talk about

  • What a CNA is
  • Where CNAs work
  • What CNAs do
  • How much CNAs make
  • How to become a CNA
  • How to find a CNA job

 

What is a CNA?

So, what is a CNA? A CNA is a healthcare worker that works closely to help serve seniors and disabled individuals. CNAs work under the supervision of a Registered Nurse or LPN to provide care according to a patient’s care plan.  Typically a care plan is developed by a doctor or RN and then a CNA helps to take care of the patient, documenting how the patient is doing and what’s been done on a daily basis.  People that have a love for caring for others tend to make great CNAs. If this is you, keep watching!

 

Where do CNAs work?

Where do CNAs work? CNAs work in a variety of settings including the home of someone that needs a care or a more clinical setting like a hospital, assisted living community, nursing home, or rehab center. Homecare CNA jobs are currently the fastest growing as more seniors are deciding to stay at home as they age. However, there a variety of options as a CNA — because the profession is in such demand, chances are you can choose where you want to work and test out a variety of options to find the best fit for you.

 

What do CNAs do?

What do CNAs do?  Depending on where you work as a CNA it will drive what your day looks like. For instance, CNAs that work in a patient’s home typically provide one-on-one care allowing you to develop a friendship with one patient. CNAs that work in a senior living setting tend to work alongside a lot of other CNAs to care for many patients at once. However, here are the basic duties of a certified nursing assistant.

1. Help patients with basic living activities like getting around the house, eating a meal, brushing teeth, going to the bathroom, bathing, combing hair, and staying active. One of the most fun parts of a CNA job is being able to learn from your clients and patients — hearing their stories, taking them to bingo, and just getting them out and about as much as their health will allow them to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

2. Follow a care plan and documenting care.  As a CNA, you’ll start your day with an outline of the patients health and what you should do that day.  Sometimes this means reminding someone to take medicine, measuring vital signs, helping someone turn over in their bed, or changing a bandage. At the end of your shift, you’ll document what you need and the patient’s status.

3. Help to maintain a tidy environment. An important part of a CNA job is helping your patients maintain a tidy living space whether this is in their home or a community setting. You may help make beds, sweep the floor, and clean out the fridge. Often times those needing care can’t do simple cleaning chores and CNAs help to provide a clean and tidy environment.

4. Assist with patient transportation. Sometimes as a CNA you may be responsible for helping to lift patients into a wheelchair, assisting to help load a patient,  attending doctor appointments and lab tests, and sometimes even driving a patient to the doctor yourself. The amount and type of transportation you will do will depend on where you choose to work and the types of patients you’re working with.

 

How much do CNAs make?

How much do CNAs make? Pay for CNA jobs varies based on your experience, where you live, and where you work.   Typically, pay ranges from $9 per hour to $17 per hour. Some companies offer live-in caregiver jobs that allow you to work a few days and earn a full salary.  For live-in jobs, we see companies paying $1,000 – $1,300 per week.  If you want to learn more about what companies are paying in your area, search jobs at myCNAjobs.com. You can enter your zip code and then see specific companies and pay rates. Our prediction is that CNA wages will start to increase even more as the demand for certified nursing assistants increases.

 

How do you become a CNA?

To become a certified nursing aide, you need to find local a local CNA school. There are currently no online CNA training options to get your state certificate — however a portion of your training may be done online. To find a local CNA class, you can visit myCNAjobs.com and click SCHOOLS. There’s a directory of training options that may also include local community colleges. It will outline the school cost and how long the classes will take. CNA classes range from 3 weeks to 12 weeks depending on the program you choose. Once you have your CNA, there are free CEUS available to maintain your certificate available at myCNAjobs — that portion of your training can be done online.

 

How do you find a CNA job?

How do you find a CNA job? This is the fun part! You can search online to find local companies that are hiring.  If you visit myCNAjobs.com you can search thousands of local companies that hiring closest to you. You can also just call our team — we can share more about current openings in your area and potentially book you for an interview! Our recruitment number is 312-275-3959 if you want to explore jobs before, during, and after you get your CNA.  Another way to find a job is to attend local job fairs. Communities typically hold job fairs throughout the year, bringing together multiple companies for you to meet in a single day.

 

Well, that’s it folks. If you like what you saw here today, consider taking the leap to take your career to the next level to become a CNA. If you’d like to access additional training materials, apply for a CNA scholarship, or research schools and local CNA jobs, be sure to check out the free resources available to you at myCNAjobs.com.

Caregiver Training: Dental Hygiene

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver Job Tip, Caregiver Resources, Caregiver Training.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Alex a team member here at myCNAjobs.

In today’s caregiver training video, I’m going to share a few best practices to help your patients and clients maintain healthy gums and teeth. We’re going to talk about dental hygiene!

Proper care of the mouth and teeth can help prevent things like eating difficulties, digestive problems and extensive dental procedures down the road. However, brushing can sometimes be challenging with seniors and can be a tough part of a caregiver or CNA job.

Sometimes, your clients just don’t want to do it, sometimes they don’t remember the importance of doing it, and sometimes it just hurts.

So, here’s what YOU can do to help.

 

Tip #1: Provide Simple Instructions

Instead of saying “hey – go brush your teeth”. Help walk your patient through the process. Say things like “hold your toothbrush”, now “let’s add the toothpaste”, and then “let’s start with your bottom teeth”.  Often times breaking up the process will be easier and result in a job well done.  The more your client can do themselves, the better. It’s tough to lose your independence so your job is to help your client keep it.

 

Tip #2: Show Your Clients

If you have a client that isn’t doing a great job, try showing them how you do it. If that doesn’t work, you can always assist your client. However, it’s best to encourage your client to do as much as they can on their own

 

Tip #3: Brush Frequently

Best practice is to brush teeth or dentures after each meal. Gums, tongue, and roof of the mouth should be very gently brushed once per day.

 

Tip #4: Monitor Changes

Part of any caregiver job is monitoring for health changes and documenting any changes you see. After each brush, check the seniors teeth and gums to check for bleeding or any unusual bumps. If you see something change, it’s important to document it. If you’re working for a home care agency, often times, the agency will have forms for you to complete at the start and end of each shift.

 

Tip #5: Visit The Dentist

Ensure your client gets to the dentist at least every 6 months and more frequently if advised by their dentist. It’s important not to miss an appointment as dentists play a critical role in overall good senior health.

 

Well, that’s it folks. Best of luck and I hope this video was helpful. If you like what you saw here and you’d like to access more caregiver training or you’re looking for a caregiver or CNA job, you can find free resources at myCNAjobs.com.

Caregiver Training: Bathing A Dementia Client

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver Resources, Caregiver Training, Home Health Aide Job.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Autumn and on the team here at myCNAjobs.

We’ve been getting a lot of questions lately on tips to bath a senior that is suffering from Alzheimer’s or Dementia. So in today’s training session I’m going to share a few best practices that we’ve compiled from others in the industry.

Bathing can be one of the most difficult personal care activities that a caregiver does in their job each day.  Because bathing is so personal, it can be a hard situation for both the caregiver and the patient. I’m hoping to leave you with some new thinking to make things a little easier.

 

Tip #1: Be Empathetic

First, it’s important to put yourself in your client’s shoes. Many dementia patients are resistant to bathing as they don’t remember what bathing is for or it just makes them uncomfortable. Loss of independence can be very difficult so it’s important to approach each bath with empathy. If you encounter a senior that is angry and combative, don’t take it personally and approach the situation with kindness.

 

Tip #2: Prepare The Bath

When possible, allow your client to do as much as they can. Have them help you gather bathing supplies, hang towels, turn the heat to a comfortable temperature, and set the water temperature. The more you can prepare your client and involve them in the process, the more smoothly the process is likely to go.

 

Tip #3: Give Control To The Client

You can provide comfort to your patient by helping them have some control in the process. Ask them things like

  • Do you prefer to take a bath now or in 15 minutes?
  • Do you prefer 4 inches of water or 5?
  • Do you prefer this shampoo or that shampoo?

The more you power you can give to the patient, the more buy in you’ll get in the process making it easier to complete a successful bath.

 

Tip #4: Control Agitation

If the patient becomes agitated, have music ready to play or a song ready to sing. Talk about a topic that is known to make the patient smile or calm down. These are great things to talk about with the patient’s family. With some memory loss patients, removing the mirrors in the bathroom can be helpful as it makes the experience feel more private.

 

Tip #5: Be Gentle & Coach

When possible, have the client wash where they can. Help coach the client on what and where to clean, guiding them through the process. Talk through the areas that you’re going to clean so there are no surprises.  Be gentle in your touch and if the client becomes agitated, stop for a moment to control the agitation before continuing.

Tip #6: Document Care

After the bath, check for rashes and sores as you help get your client dressed. After helping the senior get comfortable, document the bath including things like how the senior did, concerns you have, and if you found anything unusual. If you’re working for a home care agency, you’ll often have formal documentation to complete after each bath to provide to your employer and the client’s family. After your documentation is complete, go have fun! Bathing can be stressful so try to find an activity that is soothing to your client to help them transition.

 

Well, that’s it folks. Best of luck and I hope this video was helpful. If you like what you saw here and you’d like to access more caregiver training or you’re looking for a caregiver or CNA job, you can find free resources at myCNAjobs.com.

Caregiver Training: Homecare Caregiver Duties

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver Job Tip, Caregiver Training.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Ruby and I’m one of the recruiters here at myCNAjobs.

Today’s training session is to help those exploring a career as a home care caregiver to better understand what a caregiver is, a day in the life of a caregiver, and typical caregiver job duties.

There’s never been a better time to explore a career in home care. This is one of the fastest growing professions in America. Our Baby Boomers are aging and more seniors want to age in their home. This means they need caregivers to help care for them.

If you have a caring heart and like caring for other people, being a caregiver can be a very rewarding career to earn a living AND make a difference in the world.

So, let’s dive in. Today we’re going to talk about

  • What a home care caregiver is
  • What caregivers do
  • How much caregivers make
  • How to become a caregiver
  • How to find a caregiver job

 

What Is A Homecare Caregiver?

A caregiver that works in a home care setting helps seniors age in place and provide comfort to those that need care.  Caregivers may work under the supervision of a RN or LPN to provide care according to a patient’s care plan.  People that have a love for caring for others, have experience babysitting, or caring for friends and family tend to make great caregivers. If this is you, keep watching!

 

Where Do Homecare Caregivers Work?

Homecare caregivers work directly in the home of someone needing care. Many caregivers work directly for a homecare agency.  The agency helps connect caregivers to people in the local community that need care, manages payroll, scheduling, and overall career development path for a caregiver. Many agencies have job openings for caregivers without any experience as they are willing to train the right people on-the-job. If you want to explore local home care agencies in your area, visit myCNAjobs.com and click on JOBS. You can enter your zip code and search agencies closest to you to get an idea of the opportunities closest to you.

 

What Do Homecare Caregivers Do?

Homecare caregivers provide one-on-one care to a senior, disabled, or other types of individuals that need short or long term care in their home. Sometimes a patient will just have one caregiver and sometimes a patient may have a few caregivers if they require around the clock care. Here are a few caregiver duties.

  1. Help people with BLS – that means basic living activities.   These are things like getting around the house, eating a meal, brushing teeth, going to the bathroom, bathing, combing hair, and staying active. One of the most fun parts of a home care job is getting to know your clients — hearing their stories, taking them to bingo, and joining them in the world for fun activities!
  2. Document your care.  Depending on the patient you’re working with, you may or may not have a care plan. If you do have a care plan, this will be your guide of what you should do on any given day with your patient. All caregivers typically report on any health condition changes to let your company or the patient’s family know what happened that day.
  1. Maintain a tidy environment. An important part of a home care job is helping your patients maintain a tidy living space. It’s helpful to the patient and their loved ones if you can help with common chores like making beds, sweeping the floor, and cleaning out the fridge. It’s tough for those that are old and sick to do these things so often it’s part of how a caregiver can help provide great care for their patient.
  2. Help your clients get around. Some patients need help getting in and out of a wheelchair, to be taken to the salon to get their hair done, or driven to a doctor’s appointment. Caregivers helps their patients get to where they need to go. Sometimes this means that caregivers drive a client in their own care, sometimes in a client’s care, and sometimes it may mean accompanying them in a rideshare program like uber. The amount and type of transportation you will do will depend on your specific clients.

 

How Much Do Caregivers Make?

Pay for home care caregiver jobs varies based on your experience, where you live, and where you work.   Typically, pay ranges from $9 per hour to $17 per hour.  Some companies offer live-in caregiver jobs that allow you to work a few days and earn a full salary.  For live-in jobs, we see companies paying $1,000 – $1,300 per week.  If you want to learn more about what companies are paying in your area, search jobs at myCNAjobs.com. You can enter your zip code and then see specific companies and pay rates. Our prediction is that caregiver wages will start to increase even more as the demand for certified nursing assistants increases. Also, if you decide to get your CNA license, you typically earn a couple of dollars more per hour.

 

How Do You Become A Home Caregiver?

To get started, you need to connect with local home care agencies. Each agency is unique and will have different requirements. If you don’t have experience, most agencies provide on-the-job training to help you learn basic skills. We’ve also seen agencies create job shadow programs to allow you to get familiar with what the job is and how you can become excellent at it. Additionally, you can take free caregiver courses online at myCNAjobs.com. After you complete the course, you’ll get a certificate to print to bring to an employer to show them all of the new skills you’re learning.

 

How Do You Find A Caregiver Job?

This one is easy. Look online and get out in your community! Chances are good that there are at least a dozen agencies in your backyard. We have a directory you can use at myCNAjobs as well.  Visit myCNAjobs.com to search companies by zip code.  You can also just call our recruitment team and ask — we can share more about current openings in your area and potentially book you for an interview!   Our recruitment number is 312-275-3959.

 

Well, that’s it folks. If you like what you saw here today, there are more training videos and free resources available at myCNAjobs.com.

CNA Classes Near Me

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, CNA Job, CNA School.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Alex – one of the recruiters here at myCNAjobs.

I talk with hundreds of caregivers each month and I’m asked all the time about how to find local CNA classes. So, in today’s training session, I’m going to give you a few tips on how find a good CNA program near you to help grow a career as a certified nursing assistant.

 

Tip #1: State Approved

When researching classes to become a CNA, it’s critical to check the website for your state’s nursing board to ensure the school is state approved.  Sadly, there are many CNA programs that are not state approved and if you find yourself at one of these programs you could pay a lot of money and NOT get your license!  It’s quick and easy to check the state website and an important part of your search to find the best program.

 

Tip #2: Reputation

Google local CNA classes to read reviews online from other students. It’s important to keep in mind that you shouldn’t solely make a decision based on a few good or a few bad reviews, but it will give a framework to add to your evaluation criteria

 

Tip #3: Visit the School

Visit the school, meet their staff, and review their history. You want to find a school that has a rich history in teaching certified nursing assistants. Ask about how long they have been teaching CNAs and who teaches the classes. Get an understanding of the professor’s certifications.

 

Tip #4: Placement Rates

Look for a school with high job placement rates. Some CNA schools have a dedicated career counselor to help you navigate your job search. You can ask a school what their placement rate is to get a sense of what to expect. You can search schools that partner with myCNAjobs by visiting myCNAjobs.com and clicking SCHOOLS. Typically schools that partner with us have high placement rates as we’re working with them to help place their students in jobs before, during, and after school.

 

Tip #5: Cost

Costs for CNA classes can vary from a few hundred dollars to nearly two thousand dollars. Evaluate your top choices and then look at cost to determine what’s in your budget and where you feel you’ll get the best education.

 

If you want to learn more about CNA classes near you, visit myCNAjobs.com.  If you want to learn more about working as a caregiver before you attend CNA school, you can give us a call at 312-275-3959.

Caregiver Training: Interview Best Practices

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver Training.

 

Hi there Caregivers and welcome to our career training series. I’m Ruby and I’m one of the recruiters here at myCNAjobs.

Today, I’m pleased to talk about best practices when interviewing to help give yourself a leg up in not only getting a job offer, but the job offer you WANT!

I have the privilege of talking with hundreds of caregivers each month and learning what employers like, don’t like, and ultimately why they choose to make the hiring decisions they do.

So whether you’re watching this for your first caregiver interview or you’ve been a caregiver for a long time, my goal is to provide you with 8 quick tips to help you land the job you’re looking for.

 

Interview Tip #1: Develop Your Game Plan

Make sure you have all the logistics squared away before you leave for the interview. Know the address of where you’re going, how to get there, how much travel time you need, the parking situation, research the company website ahead of time to learn more about them, get an understanding of the documents the company wants you to bring to an interview, and lastly, know whom to ask for when you arrive.

 

Interview Tip #2: Get Your Documents Ready

With all caregiver jobs, you can get to work most quickly by coming prepared to the interview with a few key documents. Gather everything you can and bring it to your initial interview.  Here is a list of the most common requested documents

  • A Driver’s license or state ID

  • Your CNA or HHA license if you have one — some companies prefer to make a copy of your original certificate

  • An additional ID for your I9 Paperwork such as a passport or social security card

  • TB testing documents

  • And bring along any training or certifications that you have obtained while working as a caregiver — thing like CPR Certification, First Aide Certification, and certificates from any ongoing CEUs you may have completed

  • If you don’t have any formal training,you can take the free training courses on myCNAjobs.com and print those certificates to bring along to an interview as well

And bring two copies of your resume, which brings me to interview tip #2

 

Interview Tip #3: Update Your Resume

The power of a good resume cannot be underestimated. Here are a few things that you want to include in a well written resume

  • Your full name, a professional email address, and your mailing address
  • All of your work history — but keep your resume to no more than 2 pages and ideally 1 page is best. It’s best to show little or no gaps between jobs. If you have gaps in work, be prepared to explain how you were progressing your career during those times.  If you don’t have a lot of experience working as a caregiver or CNA, list personal caregiver experience if you have it — any experience that can show how you’ve cared for others can be helpful in highlighting why you’d make a great caregiver for a company.
  • Outline your education including a GED, HS diploma, and any college or healthcare training certificates that you have obtained, including the name of the school and date you graduated
  • Create a skills section outlining specific skills that are relevant to being a caregiver. Things like: CPR training, hoyer lift experience, being bi-lingual, the ability to cook diabetic friendly meals, or experience bathing a senior. A strong list can help an employer understand exactly what you know how to do today for their clients and patients.
  • And lastly, a good resume includes 4 to 5 strong references. The best references are past employers or clients that can speak to your work.  All references should include the references full name, phone, email, and a brief outline of how you know the person.

Once you have a resume in place, have someone review it to ensure there are not any spelling or grammatical errors. Then, print two copies and go to your interview prepared to talk through it. If you want more resume advice, there are free resources available at myCNAjobs.com.

 

Interview Tip #4: Arrive 5 to 10 Minutes Early

Arrive to the interview 5 to 10 minutes early. Companies tell us that many caregivers arrive a late for an interview and it turns them off. Many companies rely on caregivers to care for their clients in their homes or in a facility setting, meaning that getting someplace on time is critical in providing great care. So, show up 5 to 10 minutes early and wait in the parking lot if you’re earlier than this. It’s also bad to be too early. Map out directions the night before and always check traffic so you allow enough time to commute.  When you arrive, indicate that you excited to be interviewing and let the receptionist know who you’ll be meeting with. Be sure to be warm and kind to everyone you meet — this is your opportunity to shine and make a first impression.

 

Interview Tip #5: Let The Team Know You’re Excited To Be There

When the interview starts, let the interviewer know that you’re excited to be there. Share that you have researched their company and you’re happy to learn more about their opportunities. Ensure that the employer gets to know you, your background, and what you can bring to the table before you start diving into your questions.

 

Interview Tip #6: Show Your Passion

Answer each question to the best of your ability, honestly, and show your passion.  It’s important to talk about why you got into caregiving, why you are choosing this as a career, and why you think you’d be a great candidate for the job. Employers want to hire caregivers that a have a true passion for the industry. Sometimes interviews can be stressful and your passion for what you do can get buried. It’s important to show your excitement about caring for seniors and to come prepared with stories of how and why you feel you can positively impact a seniors life through your work.

 

Interview Tip #7: Ask Questions

Towards the end of the interview, ask if it’s okay for you to ask a few questions so you can learn more about the company. Here are a few good questions to ask:

  1. There are a lot companies in the area that do what you do — how are you different?
  2. How long do your caregivers typically stay on board with you? It’s important for me to find a company where I can stick around for awhile.
  3. Can you share details on your starting wage, opportunities to grow wages, and your benefits package?
  4. Do you have any clients or patients right now that you feel I’d be a good fit for?
  5. What are the next steps in the hiring process?

 

Interview Tip #8: Say Thank You

When you leave the interview, say thank you! Let the interviewer that you appreciate their time. And always remember to get the business cards of everyone you meet with. After the interview, drive straight to a computer and send a follow-up email! You’re much more likely to get hired and get the cases you want with a prompt follow-up message. Companies love this and it shows your commitment.

 

Well that’s it folks. Thanks for attending our session today. If you want more tips on how to become a caregiver or take your career to the next level, you can find additional videos and resources on myCNAjobs.

Until next time – best of luck in your job search!

Mississippi CNA Exam and Certification

Posted by & filed under Assisted Living Jobs, Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver Job, Caregiver Resources, Caregiver Training, CNA Job, Home Health Aide Job, Nursing Job, Working as Caregiver CNA.

Hi all – today, we’re taking a tour of Mississippi. Here’s the downlow on everything you need to know related to becoming a CNA.

CNA Certification Requirements in Mississippi

In order to work at any facility as a CNA, a Mississippi state approved certification needs to be obtained. The Mississippi State Department of Health, Bureau of Health Facilities Licensure and Certification, requires all nursing assistants to complete training and the competency exam before they can be employed and listed on the nurse aide registry. Mississippi follows the federal regulations which allows a grace period of 120 days (4 months) where a nurse aide can provide direct care services while being in the training program.However, you must meet the requirements for training and testing within four months of being hired as a nurse aide.

Become a CNA in Mississippi

Here are the steps to follow in order to become a Mississippi certified CNA:

1. Enroll in a state certified school.

2. Complete the training. Take practice CNA exam(this step is optional and may be included within certain CNA courses).

3. Register to take the state CNA exam.

4. Once you pass the exam, apply for desired  jobs!

Local CNA Training Classes

In order to attend CNA training in the state of Mississippi, the individual needs to be able to understand, read and speak English. Mississippi CNA students must be at least 18 years old. CNA also must be able to pass a criminal background check and have up to date immunization records. Nurse Aide Training in Mississippi costs between $800 and $2,500. The pre-certification training requires a minimum of 75 hours of training.

Here are a few local CNA classes in Mississippi:

CNA Classes in Jackson:

Jackson Medical Mall/CNA Training Center (601)3641188

Search All Mississippi State Certified Nursing Training Programs

Search CNA Scholarships available in Mississippi (free CNA training available)

Mississippi CNA Testing

The written exam is comprised of 70 multiple-choice questions, which you must complete in 120 minutes. You can request the oral exam when you apply.  The oral exam contains 60 multiple-choice questions and 10 reading comprehension English questions to test your understanding of common English words.

The 25-minute skills evaluation tests your performance of 5 skills; hand washing and four other skills assigned at random. You must successfully complete all five skills in order to pass the exam. The nurse evaluator will expect you to perform the critical steps in each skill.

Certification Costs To Become a CNA

  • Written and skills exam – $101

  • Oral and skills exam – $101

  • Written retest – $32

  • Skills retest – $69

  • Oral retest – $32

Out-of-State CNAs

If you’re an out-of-state CNA, you can transfer your license to Mississippi through reciprocity. You’re eligible for reciprocity only if your prior training and competency requirements in your old state are in line with OBRA ’87 regulations.

  • Download and fill out the reciprocity application

  • Provide copies of your license, training and previous employment from the old state

  • You status on the old registry must be active

  • If your certification is in expired status, you will need to take the competency exam in Mississippi

  • The registration fee is $26

The DOH will disapprove your application if there are findings of neglect and abuse on your record.

Looking for more great insight? Visit:

Local CNA Jobs in Mississippi

New Hampshire CNA Exam and Certification

Posted by & filed under Assisted Living Jobs, Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver Job, Caregiver Resources, Caregiver Training, CNA Job, Home Health Aide Job, Nursing Job, Working as Caregiver CNA.

Hi all – today, we’re taking a tour of New Hampshire. Here’s the downlow on everything you need to know related to becoming a CNA.

CNA Certification Requirements in New Hampshire

In order to work at any facility as a CNA (otherwise known as an CNA), a New Hampshire state approved certification needs to be obtained. In the state of New Hampshire, at least 75 hours of clinical and lecture training is required. Once completed there is a state exam that tests your ability to take care of a patient. When you become a Certified Nursing Assistant,  you’ll then be placed on the Health Care Worker registry. To get hired by many companies, you’ll need to be registered here.

Become a CNA in New Hampshire

Want to become a New Hampshire certified CNA? Here’s how:

  1. Enroll in a state certified school (you can search CNA school throughout New Hampshire via the CNA school directory)

  2. Complete the CNA training

  3. Take practice CNA exam (this step is optional and may be included within certain CNA courses)

  4. Register to take the state CNA exam

  5. Once you pass the exam, apply for desired  jobs to work as a certified nursing assistant!

Local CNA Training Classes

In order to attend CNA training in the state of New Hampshire, you’ll need to understand, read and speak English and have a naturally compassionate nature. Programs require for you to be at least 16 years old, able to pass a background check, have a medical exam, and have proof of immunization as well as government-issued ID card. An individual can work as a CNA while waiting for the state exam for up to 120 days. CNA training program costs can range from $200 and up.

If you are a current RN, LPN or have a CNA certification within a different state you are able to simply take the CNA exam without training.

Here are a few local CNA classes in New Hampshire:

CNA classes in Manchester

LNA Health Careers – 603-647-2174

Search all New Hampshire State Certified Nursing Training Programs

Search CNA Scholarships available in New Hampshire (free CNA training available)

NH CNA Testing

CNA training includes a written competency test as well as a skills evaluation test. You can take this test after completion of CNA classes. New Hampshire’s Board of Nursing has three approved competency testing agencies: Pearson Vue, Excel Testing, and the American Red Cross. The written exam contains 70 multiple-choice questions written in English. Candidates have 120 minutes to complete all questions. If you have difficulty reading English, you can request the oral exam at the time of application. The oral exam contains 60 multiple choice test questions and 10 multiple choice questions that test your understanding of common English words.For the skills assessment, your performance will be rated on the completion of five (5) skills. One of the skills will be Hand washing, and the remaining four will be assigned at random from the list of nursing assistant skills.

Certification Costs To Become a CNA

  • Skills and written test – $105.00

  • Skills and oral test – $120.00

  • Skills retest – $65.00

  • Written retest – $40

  • Oral test – $55.00

  • Reschedule fee – $30

For questions related to scheduling and testing contact:

New Hampshire registry

Phone: (603) 271-6282 or (603) 271-2323

License Verification: (603) 271-6599

Fax: (603) 271-6605

Out-of-State CNAs

Out-of-state CNAs are allowed to apply for inclusion on the Health care Workers Registry if in good and active standing on another state registry. You can apply for inclusion on the NH Registry through endorsement.The steps for endorsement are as follows:

  • Obtain fingerprint and criminal background check

  • Download and fill out the application for endorsement

  • Provide copies of the nurse assistant training and certification

  • Provide proof of at least 200 hours of nurse assistant service within two years prior to the application.

CNA Nurse Registry

New Hampshire Nurse Aide Registry

New Hampshire Board of Nursing

21 South Fruit Street, Suite 16, Concord, NH 03301

Looking for more great insight? Visit:

Local CNA Jobs in New Hampshire

Oregon CNA Exam and Certification

Posted by & filed under Assisted Living Jobs, Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver Job, Caregiver Resources, Caregiver Training, CNA Job, Home Health Aide Job, Nursing Job, Working as Caregiver CNA.

Hi all – today, we’re taking a tour of Illinois. Here’s the downlow on everything you need to know related to becoming a CNA.

CNA Certification Requirements in Oregon

In order to become a nurse aide in Oregon the nurse aide must complete a state-approved training program, pass the state nurse aide competency, and meet all the other requirements for certification to continue working as a Certified Nursing Assistant.

Become a CNA in Oregon

Want to become an Oregon certified CNA? Here’s how:

1.Enroll in a state certified school (you can search CNA school throughout Oregon via the CNA school directory)

2.Complete the CNA training

3.Take practice CNA exam (this step is optional and may be included within certain CNA courses)

4.Register to take the state CNA exam

5.Once you pass the exam, apply for desired  jobs to work as a certified nursing assistant!

Local CNA Training Classes

  • 16 years or older

  • High school diploma or GED (recommended)

  • minimum of 80 hours of classroom and 75 hours of clinical training for CNA I certification.

  • Graduating from a state-accredited training program does not imply automatic state certification – students must first pass the state’s written and skills exam with a grade of 75 percent or more to obtain a listing on the registry.

  • Community colleges and private institutions account for more than 75 percent of the programs approved by the OSBN. The cost of training at these institutions is approximately $1000, but there will be associated costs such as reading tests, lab fee, textbook, CPR certification, uniform, certification fee and other costs. Unlike other states, Oregon has several approved online programs, which have variable costs.

-Fingerprinting, immunization, and a drug screen may be required for clinical placement.

Here are a few local CNA classes in Oregon:

CNA Classes in Portland

Portland Community College (971)722-6111

Caregiver Training Institute  (503) 2570117 ext.104

Clackamas Nursing Assistant Training (503)709-6560

CNA Classes in Eugene

Lane Community College (541) 463-3000

CNA Classes in Gresham

Mt Hood Community College (503)491-6422

Search all Oregon State Certified Nursing Training Programs

Search CNA Scholarships available in Oregon (free CNA training available)

OR CNA Testing

The OSBN has approved Headmaster, LLP to administer and score the nurse aide competency exam in which you will need:

  • A fingerprint-based criminal background check (non-refundable)

  • Training program certificate of completion (non-refundable)

  • CNA certification fee

Oregon gives nurse aides the option of written or computerized tests. If you are a first time tester, you  must take the written and skills test on the same day. The test comprises of:

  • 80 multiple choice questions ( must complete in 90 minutes or less)

  • The test evaluates your knowledge in specific areas, including communication, infection control, patient safety, disease process, basic nursing skills, mental health, personal care, client rights and care for impaired persons

You’ll have to perform one of the four mandatory tasks:

  • Perineal Care with Hand Washing

  • Bed Pan and Output with Hand Washing

  • Catheter Care with Handwashing

  • Gown and Gloves, Emptying a Urinary Drainage Bag with Hand Washing

Another two or three tasks will be selected at random from the Skills List – found in your course textbook or the Candidate Handbook

Certification Costs To Become a CNA

  • Reactivation by exam – (knowledge and skills tests) – $106

  • Oral skills exam – $35 (additional)

  • Written and skills initial exam – $106

  • Knowledge retest – $25

  • Skills retest – $45

  • Knowledge and skills retest – $70

For questions related to scheduling and testing contact The Oregon State Board of Nursing using the following information:

Out-of-State CNAs

Out-of-state CNAs can transfer their certification to Oregon by way of endorsement if they’re in active status with their home state. Following are the requirements for endorsement:

  • You must provide proof of completing a training program, according to OBRA standards

  • Provide proof of at least 400 hours of paid employment as a CNA under the supervision of a nurse

  • Complete a criminal background check

  • Verification from the nurse aide registry in your home state (if your licensed is expired, you won’t be eligible for endorsement)

  • Submit the endorsement application along with the required documents.

CNA Nurse Registry

Oregon State Board of Nursing

17938 SW Upper Boones Ferry Rd.

Portland, Oregon 97224-7012

Email: oregon.bn.info@state.or.us

Phone: 971-673-0685

Fax: 971-673-0684

Looking for more great insight? Visit:

Local CNA Jobs in Oregon

Rhode Island CNA Exam and Certification

Posted by & filed under Assisted Living Jobs, Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver Job, Caregiver Resources, Caregiver Training, CNA Job, Home Health Aide Job, Nursing Job, Working as Caregiver CNA.

Hi all – today, we’re taking a tour of Illinois. Here’s the downlow on everything you need to know related to becoming a CNA.

CNA Certification Requirements in Rhode Island

In order to become a nurse aid in Rhode Island you must complete state-approved nurse aide training programs. The state will then test your knowledge and evaluate your skills via the competency evaluation. Nurse aides who pass both the written and skill components receive their license to work and a listing on the Rhode Island Nurse Aide Registry.

Become a CNA in Rhode Island

Want to become an Oregon certified CNA? Here’s how:

1.Enroll in a state certified school (you can search CNA school throughout Rhode Island via the CNA school directory)

2.Complete the CNA training

3.Take practice CNA exam (this step is optional and may be included within certain CNA courses)

4.Register to take the state CNA exam

5.Once you pass the exam, apply for desired  jobs to work as a certified nursing assistant!

Local CNA Training Classes

  • Pass the training program’s entrance evaluation if you don’t have a high school diploma

  • Be at least 18 years old

  • Criminal background clearance

  • Up-to-date immunization records

  • Negative TB and drug tests

  • Physical exam report prepared by a physician

Here are a few local CNA classes in Rhode Island:

CNA Classes in Providence

Home Health Care (401) 751-3152

CNA Classes in Riverside

Bastien Academy (401) 369-9174

Search all Rhode Island State Certified Nursing Training Programs

Search CNA Scholarships available in Rhode Island (free CNA training available)

RI CNA Testing

The Rhode Island Competency exams is administered by Pearson Vue – the administering body for the state exam. The exam will test your knowledge and competency skills, and you must pass both components in order to obtain your license. The two-part test consists of a written examination and skills evaluation both administered on the same day.

The skills evaluation tests your skills in a mock-healthcare setting. The center provides all the equipment to perform the assigned tasks, and you must complete all 5 skills within the allotted time. The testing center selects 4 skills at random and will ask you to demonstrate your hand washing techniques (for the fifth skill).

Certification Costs To Become a CNA

  • Written and Skills Evaluation – $99

  • Oral and Skills Evaluation – $99

  • Written Exam re-tests – $30

  • Oral Exam re-tests – $30

  • Skills Evaluation re-tests – $69

For questions related to scheduling and testing contact Pearson Vue using the following information:

Address:

36 Hemingway Dr, East Providence, RI 02915

Phone: (401) 434-4510

Website : https://home.pearsonvue.com/

Out-of-State CNAs

Out-of-state CNAs can obtain a license to work in Rhode Island through reciprocity. To transfer your license you need too:

  • Visit the Department of Health and download the application form

  • Submit proof of your certification. The training in your home state must cover at least 100 hours of training.

  • Apply for a criminal background check at the RI office of the Attorney General

  • Get the application notarized and submit it with a passport sized photo and the $40 transfer fee to the registry

CNA Nurse Registry

Rhode Island Nurse Aide Registry

Rhode Island Department of Health Professionals

3 Capitol Hill, Room 105, Providence, RI 02908

Phone: (401) 222-5888

Fax: (401) 222-3352

Looking for more great insight? Visit:

Local CNA Jobs in Rhode Island

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