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CNA Training: Working in Assisted Living

Posted by & filed under Assisted Living Jobs, Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver CNA Pay, Caregiver Job, CNA Job, Home Health Aide Job, Nursing Job, Working as Caregiver CNA.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Karla and I’m one of the recruiters here at myCNAjobs.

Today’s training session is to help those CNAs and caregivers who are looking to learn more about the duties and roles that take place while working in an Assisted Living setting.

Assisted Living jobs are available for CNAs across the nation. Essentially, an assisted living community is a housing option for elderly or disabled people that provides nursing care, housekeeping, and prepared meals as needed in the comfort of one community.

Jobs in assisted living are booming with hundreds of communities opening each year across the country. Many of the newer assisted living communities offer an amazing work environment, cool areas for caregivers to gather, and a beautiful setting to both work and care for your patients.

So, let’s dive in.  Today we’re going answer a few questions about what it’s like to work within assisted living for a CNA.

#1 – What are the residents like?

Residents living within a community generally can perform a few ADLs (fancy way of saying activities of daily living) on their own. Residents generally need some care, and also are there for socialization and to be around great caregivers like yourself and to engage with other residents. If a senior gets ill or can no longer perform ADLs on their own, generally they move to a more skilled building like a nursing home.

#2 Who do you work for in an assisted living community?

Most of the time you’ll work directly for the D-O-N – or director of nursing. The director of nursing will outline your specific duties, care plans for the residents, and manage the day to duties of a certified nursing assistant. This is someone you can learn from! Be a sponge! Learn as much as you can from your D-O-N. A good D-O-N will help you build your skills and strengthen your career as a CNA.

#3 – What’s a day in the life of a CNA in an assisted living community?

Depending on the size and type of community you work, your job as a CNA can vary. However, here are a few core job duties to expect.
1. Assisting residents with the daily living activities they may struggle with like ensuring they get to the cafeteria safely, eat a safe meal, have a good shower, and take their medication.  Consider yourself their right hand person.
2. Help residents keep a tidy room by cleaning linens, changing beds, and picking-up
3. Documenting the care you provide as well as any change in health that you may see during your shift
4. And the best part, you’ll share a laugh with residents, assist the activities director with fun activities, and help your patients enjoy their day. Hands down, one of the most rewarding parts of a CNA assisted living job!

#4 – How much can you expect to make working in assisted living?

Pay for CNA jobs in assisted living will vary based on where you live and your experience. We’ve seen pay range from $9 to $17 per hour.  Many communities also offer health benefits for full-time workers and we’ve seen many communities start to offer things like free meals onsite, paid time off, and perks such as 401k programs. If you want to see how much employers are paying in your area, visit myCNAjobs.com and type in your zip code. You’ll be able to assess the going rate.

 

Well, that’s it folks. If you’re looking for a job to work as a certified nursing assistant in assisted living, we wish you the best. Feel free to check out the jobs and career fairs available in your area at myCNAjobs.com — we work with a lot of assisted living facilities across the country and we’re happy to connect you to different jobs based on what you’re looking for.  Or if you prefer, just give us a call to talk directly with a recruiter.

CNA Job Insight: Top Reported Home Care Agencies to Work For

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Nick, a recruiter here at myCNAjobs

Each year, we survey thousands of caregivers and CNAs to see where they want to work, ranking companies across the nation.

I’m excited to share with you our latest results of the top 10 large home care companies with multiple locations. There are a lot of good companies on list if you’re looking to pick up a shift or for a new company to grow a CNA career

So without further ado, here’s what CNAs across the country told us. They want to work for

  • Visiting Angels
  • Senior Helpers BrightStar Care
  • Comfort Keepers
  • Home Care Assistance
  • Home Instead Senior Care
  • Right at Home In Home Care
  • Assisting Hands Home Care
  • Interim Health Care
  • Humana Senior Bridge

I took a peek at what each company offers CNAs and here are some of the benefits that stood out.

 

Visiting Angels offers some assistance in becoming a home care aid, they also help pay for your TB Test, and Live Scan.

Senior Helpers offers training when you become a Senior Helper, you will have access to the Senior Helpers University where you can take courses to learn how to be a better caregiver and potentially increase your salary based on your certification level.

BrightStar Care offers competitive base salaries, incentive pay opportunities, and additional value-added benefits that allow our employees to enjoy a high quality of life and personal success.

Comfort Keepers offers care for their employees by offering Mileage reimbursement, including review and merit-based raises

Home Care Assistance home care offers regular hours, stable work and minimal waiting periods between cases. We offer a variety of schedules from full-time, live-in to hourly care, and can accommodate your preferred work schedule.

Home Instead Senior Care offers initial and on-going job training including specialized training opportunities, such as dementia and alzheimer’s for clients. They stay connected with their staff with a biweekly newsletter that shares information about staff changes, announcements for caregivers, caregivers birthdays and events coming up.

Right at Home In Home Care offers a new, enhanced Right at Home University. This new online system offers more than 500 nationally recognized certification and training programs along with state-specific training, approved continuing education and more professional development opportunities.

Assisting Hands Home Care offers Aflac Insurance and weekend sign on bonus to compliment your commitment.

Interim Healthcare has more than 300 offices across the country,they can offer a variety of assignments to meet your needs

Humana Senior Bridge Home Care offers healthy and security options such as Life insurance, Healthy living rewards, and Retirement savings plan.

 

So that’s it folks. And, we’re lucky enough to work with many companies on this list here at myCNAjobs. So if you’re looking for a CNA job within a home care agency, be sure to check out upcoming jobs, career fairs, and interview opportunities at myCNAjobs.com or call us to talk to a recruiter directly.  Thanks for listening in!

CNA Job Insight: Top Reported Assisted Living Communities to Work For

Posted by & filed under Assisted Living Jobs, Caregiver Resume.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Kyle, one of the team members here at myCNAjobs.

Each year, we survey thousands of caregivers and CNAs to see where they want to work, ranking companies across the nation.

I’m excited to share with you our latest results of the top 10. So without further ado, here are the top assisted living companies CNAs report wanting to work.

  • Sunrise Senior Living
  • Brookdale Senior Living
  • Genesis Healthcare
  • Five Star Quality Care
  • HCR Manor CARE
  • Life Care Centers of America
  • Signature Healthcare
  • Golden Living
  • Atria Senior Living
  • Meridian Senior Living

I took a peak at what each company offers CNAs and here are some of the benefits that stood out.

 

Sunrise Senior Living offers care for both your health and personal life, with comprehensive medical and prescription drug plan as well as paid vacation, sick, holiday and bereavement leave.

Brookdale Senior Living offers unique educational opportunities like Brookdale University, and tuition reimbursement programs that allow associates to always continue learning.

Genesis Healthcare offers Relocation Assistance for select positions throughout the country, if you are planning to relocate or seeking a new adventure.

Five Star Quality Care offers Medical and dependent Care FSA, as well as life insurance.

HCR Manor CARE offers Continuing Education, Tuition Reimbursement, and Innovative Training Programs

Life Care Centers of America offers wide variety of services, including long-term care, post-acute recovery and short-term rehabilitation, allows clinicians to continually learn and further enhance their skills.

Signature Healthcare offers nursing opportunities in a variety of care settings, including skilled nursing, post acute, and Alzheimers/dementia. This allows nurses to perform to the best of their abilities and advance their careers.

Golden Living offers flexible scheduling and great training programs.

Atria Senior Living offers fantastic supportive team to work alongside, with training opportunites.

Meridian Senior Living offers great regional support, alongside with great work environment, pay and benefits.
So that’s if folks.

 

And, we’re lucky enough to work with many companies on this list here at myCNAjobs. So if you’re looking for a CNA job within assisted living, be sure to check out upcoming jobs, career fairs, and interview opportunities at myCNAjobs.com or call us to talk to a recruiter directly. Thanks for listening in!

Caregiver Training: Transferring To A Wheelchair

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, caregiver cna interview, Caregiver Job Tip, Caregiver Resources, Live In Caregiver, Working as Caregiver CNA.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Ruby and I’m one of the recruiters here at myCNAjobs.

Today’s training session is for caregivers and certified nursing assistants that are looking to learn best practices to transfer a patient from their bed to a wheelchair. During a transfer, the safety of both your patient and your own is critical. Let’s dive into a few best practices.

  • How to prepare for a wheelchair transfer

  • How to sit a patient up

  • How to stand a patient up and how to sit a patient down

  • What to do once a patient is in their wheelchair

#1 How to Prepare For A Wheelchair Transfer

In order to successfully move a patient from a bed to their wheelchair, you will need a few tools.

  1. A gait belt is optional, however, this will facilitate the lifting process,

  2. a wheelchair,

  3. and if you are unable to perform the task by yourself, do not hesitate to ask for help.

 

You want to communicate with your patient, introduce yourself, and explain how the process will work. Wash your hands, and if needed, wear gloves in case there are any body fluids.

 

#2 How To Sit A Patient Up

Ask the patient if they can scoot themselves towards you on the end of the bed —  if they need help, go ahead and assist them. Have the patient cross their arms over their chest and put your arm underneath their shoulders and the other arm underneath their knees. Make sure your legs are in a wide stance. Count to three so you and the client are on the same page. Lift their back and pivot the patient’s legs over the edge of the bed. Have them sit up straight and ask if they feel dizzy.

 

#3 How To Stand A Patient Up & How To Sit A Patient Down

Now, the next step is crucial because you are lifting the patient up from the bed and onto the wheelchair. Have the patient scoot to the edge of the bed, and once again assist them if needed. Help the patient put on their shoes. Ask the patient if their shoes are on properly, and make sure their feet are flat on the floor. If you have a gait belt, put the gait belt around their waist. Four fingers have to be placed between the gait belt and the patient and lock it into place. Position the wheelchair next to the bed, and lock it in. If you do not have a gait belt, grasp your hands behind the patient’s back for support. Have the patient put their feet together and explain to them how you will lift them up so the patient, nor yourself will get hurt. Have them put their hands over your shoulders and grab them by the gait belt with one hand on each side of their waist holding onto the belt. Count to three, lift, and bend your knees as you pivot onto the chair.

 

#4 What To Do Once A Patient Is In Their Wheelchair

Once your patient is in their wheelchair, Ask them if they are comfortable. Position the leg rest and foot pedals for support and carefully lift their feet onto the pedals. Ask them one last time if they are comfortable and if they need anything before you leave. Ensure nothing is in their way. Thank the patient, dispose of gloves if any were used, and wash your hands.

Well, that is it. If you like what you saw here today, there are more training videos and free resources available at myCNAjobs.com.

Caregiver Training: Tips on Meal Prepping for Seniors

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver Job, Caregiver Job Tip, Caregiver Resources, Caregiver Training, Working as Caregiver CNA.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Ruby and I’m one of the recruiters here at myCNAjobs.

Today’s training session is to help provide some key tips on how to cook for seniors, making it easier for you and your patient or loved one to keep a healthy balanced diet.

You don’t have to be a master chef to help a senior have a fully belly enriched with nutrition. Cooking is a labor of love and with these tips you will be able to have a better understanding of what to do to help your patient enjoy their meals, all while helping them stay healthy.

Eating healthy is very important, especially when it comes to seniors. Did you know it can be detrimental a seniors health if they are not served with the proper nutrition? This is a key part of any caregiver or CNA job.

So, let’s dive in.  Today we’re going to talk about:

  1. Why Seniors Have different Nutritional Needs
  2. How to make food directed for Senior Palates
  3. Key Nutritional Vitamins for Seniors
  4. How to prevent Senior Malnutrition
  5. How to solve common Senior Diet Issues

 

#1 – Why Seniors Have different Nutritional Needs

As humans we go through many physical and physiological changes as we grow older, these changes can vary from dental, gastrointestinal, and even our taste palate. That is why it is important to adjust accordingly to your patient and their needs.

Over the years our  taste buds decrease, and the way we taste food differs. The taste in food is completely different than what we were used to in the past, often taking more bitter or sour.

Loss of smell can also play a role to being less satisfied with a meal – what used to be an amazing aroma attached with every meal, has changed to a less appealing smell. This is why portion size and food presentation is especially important for seniors with strict diet requirements.

Not to mention other aging-related changes such as dentition and gastrointestinal changes. The loss of teeth or use of dentures requires specific foods to help the patient be able to chew, and enjoy without discomfort. Gastrointestinal changes such as constipation, chronic gastritis, or delayed stomach emptying and gas are require special attention to meals to help avoid discomfort.

This is why it is important to pay attention and use your time to prepare what will help your patient living a more fulfilling diet.

#2 – How to make food directed for Senior Palates

  • Adding fresh herbs, spices, onion, garlic, ginger can add flavor without relying on less healthy salt
  • Consider frozen veggies- they have similar benefits as fresh
  • Buy plenty of nuts and high fiber food- these can help lower blood cholesterol & helps keep them full
  • Add naturally sweet foods instead of real sugar- such as yams or sweet potatoes

#3 – Key Nutritional Vitamins for Seniors

  • Folic Acid 400 mcg per day: Foods rich in Folic Acid: spinach, asparagus, breakfast cereal, lentils.
  • B-12 2.4 mcg per day: Foods rich in B-12: turkey, salmon, crab, clams, mussels, chicken, beef, eggs, milk.
  • Vitamin C 75-90 mg per day: Foods rich in Vitamin C: oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, tomatoes, sweet red pepper, broccoli, potatoes.
  • Vitamin D 600-800 IU per day: Foods rich in Vitamin D: canned salmon, sardines or mackerel, instant oatmeal, cereal, egg yolk, soy milk, cow’s milk or orange juice fortified with Vitamin D.
  • Essential Fatty Acids (EFA) Foods rich in EFAs: flaxseed oil, canned tuna, oysters, herring or sardines, salmon, trout, crab.

#4 – How to help prevent Senior Malnutrition

  • Check the refrigerator and observe eating habits
  • Watch for health changes and fluctuation in weight
  • Encourage foods rich in the 5 key vitamins and nutrients
  • Boost hydration with 9 glasses of water a day
  • Meal Prep days ahead

#5-How to solve common Senior Diet Issues

 

Although you may be trying your hardest to instill a healthy balanced diet for your patient, you may run into some common problems, not to worry we are here to help.

 

  • If your patient can’t chew, here’s what to do
    • Instead of fresh fruit, try fruit juices and soft canned fruits, such as applesauce, peaches and pears.
    • Instead of raw vegetables, try vegetable juices; creamed, mashed and cooked vegetables.
    • Instead of chewy meat as a protein, try ground meat, eggs, milk, cheese, yogurt and foods made with milk, such as pudding and cream soups.
    • Instead of sliced bread, try cooked cereals, rice, bread pudding and soft cookies.

 

  • If your patient has an Upset Stomach
    • Instead of milk, try milk foods that may not upset the stomach, such as cream soups, pudding, yogurt and cheese.
    • Instead of vegetables, such as cabbage and broccoli, try vegetable juices and other vegetables, such as green beans, carrots and potatoes.
    • Instead of fresh fruit, try fruit juices and soft canned fruits.

 

  • If your patient has No Appetite

First it’s important to understand that there can be many reasons for loss of appetitive such as depression and being on certain medications. So first, understand. Second, here’s how you can help

    • Make their sole provider aware of the situation
    • Try to cook their favorite foods
    • Increase the flavor of food by adding spices and herbs
    • Talk to their doctor, about their medication, so they can adjust if needed

Well, that’s it folks.  Best of luck caring for your patient and loved one and I hope you learned something today.  If you like what you saw here today, there are more caregiver training videos and free resources available at myCNAjobs.com.

CNA Training: Assisting A Resident With A Bedpan

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, CNA Job, Live In Caregiver, Working as Caregiver CNA.

 

Hi there and welcome to our training series. I’m Nick, one of the team members here at myCNAjobs.

Today’s training session is to help CNAs and Caregivers learn how to assist a resident or loved one with a bedpan. This is a common responsibility for any patient who is bed bound.

Knowing this skill is essential even if your current client doesn’t use a bedpan — it’s a baseline skill that should be known so you can be prepared for any situation.  Understanding how to best use a bedpan will ensure your client or patient has the best experience by preventing discomfort, embarrassment, and unwanted messes.

So, let’s dive in.  Today we’re going to talk about:

  • Sanitizing & Introduction to using a bedpan
  • Supplies Needed
  • Preparing your Setting
  • Step by Step Tutorial

 

Sanitizing/Introduction

To start, proper sanitation is required to prevent the spread of germs. Before introducing yourself to your patients, wash hands thoroughly. Any time you are leaving the room you must wash hands before leaving and also hand the resident the call light for safety purposes if you have one.

 

Supplies Needed

Gather your supplies neatly, and as a reminder wash your hands when you leave the room for the supplies. You will need the following: protective barrier to place supplies on and to place under patient, 2 sets of gloves, paper towels and toilet paper, blanket, bedpan

 

Preparing Setting

Make sure the resident is granted privacy by either closing the blinds or curtains, lock the bed wheels for safety, and raise the bed to your work level to avoid hurting your own back.

 

Step-by-Step Tutorial

  1. Wash Hands
  1. When arriving to the room, introduce yourself; it is important because getting consent from the resident will help them feel more comfortable and compliant. Begin by introducing yourself, “Hi I am (your name), is it okay if I come in?” Check the rest pad and let the resident know you are there to help them with the bedpan.
  1. Wash hands before leaving the room. Come back and neatly spread supplies in the order of use:
    1. Protective barriers
    2. Blanket
    3. 2 sets of gloves
    4. Paper towels
    5. toilet paper
    6. bed pan
  1. As mentioned, prepare your setting. Ensure privacy by closing the curtains. Ensure safety by locking the wheels on the bed and adjusting the bed to your height to protect yourself.
  1. Make patient feel comfortable and promote independence. You can achieve this by allowing them to help you put on bath sheet to keep their bed sheets clean and sliding those down to the foot of the bed.
  1. Assist moving patient closer to you in all 3 sections of the body: head and shoulders, midsection, and legs. Ask patient to cross arms and legs. Let the patient know that at the count of 3 you will be flipping them over to their side.They are able to hold on to the railing for support and ensure they remain covered up.
  1. Put first set of gloves on. Tuck protective barrier under her in the midsection area. Grab the bedpan and remember to have the flatter side up top to go against her back and the rear area will be placed closer to the crotch area.Either rest bedpan on the bed and have patient roll on to it OR placing the bedpan on her back first and then holding it against them until they roll onto the bedpan. Remove gloves.
  1. Following the bedpan placement, raise the bed so the patient is in a sitting position. Raise it to about a 30-45 degree angle.Give the patient the call light so they can have privacy while using the bedpan and let them know to press on it when they are done.Also to promote independence let them know you will slide the side table with tissues for them incase they are able to wipe themselves. Let them know you will be back in 5 minutes or when they press the call light. Wash your hands, and leave the room.
  1. After time has passed, knock on the door and let patient know you are back. Ask whether they were able to wipe themselves.Set two paper towels aside for bedpan first either on nearby chair or counter.Then, IF NOT, get three wet tissues to wipe your patient and 2 extra dry tissues to dry up.
  1. Put second set of gloves on and lower bed back to your work height. Let patient know they will be rolling up to their left side again.This time around, you must use right hand to hold down bedpan to prevent it from tipping over while rolling the patient. Count to three again to roll her and ensure she is still covered by her blankets.Put a paper towel on the bedpan and place on the paper towels left for placement. (It is important not to let waste exposed).
  1. Let the patient know you will be using wet tissues to wipe them. Get one tissue and wipe the buttcheek front to back, dispose of the tissue either with a plastic bag or in the trash.Use the other wet tissue to wipe the buttcheek from front to back again and repeat with the third to clean right down the middle front to back.With the extra go right down the middle again and finally use the last dry tissue to pat dry front to back again.
  1. Remove the protective barrier. Remove gloves and sanitize hands again. Help patient back to front.
  1. Give the patient the call light while you let them know you are going to go dispose of the items. With gloves proceed to gather supplies that will be disposed.Take all of the paper towels and tissues to the toilet and observe waste for any abnormalities and dump to the toilet.
  1. Remove gloves and wash hands again. The last step will be to proceed back into the room and have patient assist putting blanket back on and removing the bath sheet and place in linen bowl.
  1. Finally, get patient comfortable and ask if there is anything else that they would like you to do. Give the patient their call light, double check that the wheels of the bed are locked and center patient. Say good bye and sanitize hands then leave the room.

 

Well, that’s it folks. I hope this was helpful to teach you a few best practices on how to help your residents use a bedpan. If you like what you saw here today, there are more training videos and free resources available at myCNAjobs.com.

CNA Training: CNA Duties

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver CNA Pay, CNA Job, CNA School, Working as Caregiver CNA.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Ruby and I’m one of the recruiters here at myCNAjobs.

Today’s training session is to help those exploring a career as a certified nursing assistant to better understand what a CNA is, a day in the life of a CNA, and typical CNA job duties.

There’s never been a better time to explore a career in nursing. As a CNA, you’re joining the fastest growing profession in America….meaning job security! You can work anywhere you want in the country and likely find a job.

First, it’s important to understand there are a lot of different names for a CNA depending on your State. Sometimes, companies refer to CNAs as Certified Nursing Assistants, Certified Nursing Aides, Nurse Aides, and sometimes event State Tested Nursing Assistants. Regardless of your state, being a nurse aide is an important job that’s very much in demand.

So, let’s dive in.  Today we’re going to talk about

  • What a CNA is
  • Where CNAs work
  • What CNAs do
  • How much CNAs make
  • How to become a CNA
  • How to find a CNA job

 

What is a CNA?

So, what is a CNA? A CNA is a healthcare worker that works closely to help serve seniors and disabled individuals. CNAs work under the supervision of a Registered Nurse or LPN to provide care according to a patient’s care plan.  Typically a care plan is developed by a doctor or RN and then a CNA helps to take care of the patient, documenting how the patient is doing and what’s been done on a daily basis.  People that have a love for caring for others tend to make great CNAs. If this is you, keep watching!

 

Where do CNAs work?

Where do CNAs work? CNAs work in a variety of settings including the home of someone that needs a care or a more clinical setting like a hospital, assisted living community, nursing home, or rehab center. Homecare CNA jobs are currently the fastest growing as more seniors are deciding to stay at home as they age. However, there a variety of options as a CNA — because the profession is in such demand, chances are you can choose where you want to work and test out a variety of options to find the best fit for you.

 

What do CNAs do?

What do CNAs do?  Depending on where you work as a CNA it will drive what your day looks like. For instance, CNAs that work in a patient’s home typically provide one-on-one care allowing you to develop a friendship with one patient. CNAs that work in a senior living setting tend to work alongside a lot of other CNAs to care for many patients at once. However, here are the basic duties of a certified nursing assistant.

1. Help patients with basic living activities like getting around the house, eating a meal, brushing teeth, going to the bathroom, bathing, combing hair, and staying active. One of the most fun parts of a CNA job is being able to learn from your clients and patients — hearing their stories, taking them to bingo, and just getting them out and about as much as their health will allow them to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

2. Follow a care plan and documenting care.  As a CNA, you’ll start your day with an outline of the patients health and what you should do that day.  Sometimes this means reminding someone to take medicine, measuring vital signs, helping someone turn over in their bed, or changing a bandage. At the end of your shift, you’ll document what you need and the patient’s status.

3. Help to maintain a tidy environment. An important part of a CNA job is helping your patients maintain a tidy living space whether this is in their home or a community setting. You may help make beds, sweep the floor, and clean out the fridge. Often times those needing care can’t do simple cleaning chores and CNAs help to provide a clean and tidy environment.

4. Assist with patient transportation. Sometimes as a CNA you may be responsible for helping to lift patients into a wheelchair, assisting to help load a patient,  attending doctor appointments and lab tests, and sometimes even driving a patient to the doctor yourself. The amount and type of transportation you will do will depend on where you choose to work and the types of patients you’re working with.

 

How much do CNAs make?

How much do CNAs make? Pay for CNA jobs varies based on your experience, where you live, and where you work.   Typically, pay ranges from $9 per hour to $17 per hour. Some companies offer live-in caregiver jobs that allow you to work a few days and earn a full salary.  For live-in jobs, we see companies paying $1,000 – $1,300 per week.  If you want to learn more about what companies are paying in your area, search jobs at myCNAjobs.com. You can enter your zip code and then see specific companies and pay rates. Our prediction is that CNA wages will start to increase even more as the demand for certified nursing assistants increases.

 

How do you become a CNA?

To become a certified nursing aide, you need to find local a local CNA school. There are currently no online CNA training options to get your state certificate — however a portion of your training may be done online. To find a local CNA class, you can visit myCNAjobs.com and click SCHOOLS. There’s a directory of training options that may also include local community colleges. It will outline the school cost and how long the classes will take. CNA classes range from 3 weeks to 12 weeks depending on the program you choose. Once you have your CNA, there are free CEUS available to maintain your certificate available at myCNAjobs — that portion of your training can be done online.

 

How do you find a CNA job?

How do you find a CNA job? This is the fun part! You can search online to find local companies that are hiring.  If you visit myCNAjobs.com you can search thousands of local companies that hiring closest to you. You can also just call our team — we can share more about current openings in your area and potentially book you for an interview! Our recruitment number is 312-275-3959 if you want to explore jobs before, during, and after you get your CNA.  Another way to find a job is to attend local job fairs. Communities typically hold job fairs throughout the year, bringing together multiple companies for you to meet in a single day.

 

Well, that’s it folks. If you like what you saw here today, consider taking the leap to take your career to the next level to become a CNA. If you’d like to access additional training materials, apply for a CNA scholarship, or research schools and local CNA jobs, be sure to check out the free resources available to you at myCNAjobs.com.

Caregiver Training: Dental Hygiene

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver CNA Duties, Caregiver Job Tip, Caregiver Resources, Caregiver Training.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Alex a team member here at myCNAjobs.

In today’s caregiver training video, I’m going to share a few best practices to help your patients and clients maintain healthy gums and teeth. We’re going to talk about dental hygiene!

Proper care of the mouth and teeth can help prevent things like eating difficulties, digestive problems and extensive dental procedures down the road. However, brushing can sometimes be challenging with seniors and can be a tough part of a caregiver or CNA job.

Sometimes, your clients just don’t want to do it, sometimes they don’t remember the importance of doing it, and sometimes it just hurts.

So, here’s what YOU can do to help.

 

Tip #1: Provide Simple Instructions

Instead of saying “hey – go brush your teeth”. Help walk your patient through the process. Say things like “hold your toothbrush”, now “let’s add the toothpaste”, and then “let’s start with your bottom teeth”.  Often times breaking up the process will be easier and result in a job well done.  The more your client can do themselves, the better. It’s tough to lose your independence so your job is to help your client keep it.

 

Tip #2: Show Your Clients

If you have a client that isn’t doing a great job, try showing them how you do it. If that doesn’t work, you can always assist your client. However, it’s best to encourage your client to do as much as they can on their own

 

Tip #3: Brush Frequently

Best practice is to brush teeth or dentures after each meal. Gums, tongue, and roof of the mouth should be very gently brushed once per day.

 

Tip #4: Monitor Changes

Part of any caregiver job is monitoring for health changes and documenting any changes you see. After each brush, check the seniors teeth and gums to check for bleeding or any unusual bumps. If you see something change, it’s important to document it. If you’re working for a home care agency, often times, the agency will have forms for you to complete at the start and end of each shift.

 

Tip #5: Visit The Dentist

Ensure your client gets to the dentist at least every 6 months and more frequently if advised by their dentist. It’s important not to miss an appointment as dentists play a critical role in overall good senior health.

 

Well, that’s it folks. Best of luck and I hope this video was helpful. If you like what you saw here and you’d like to access more caregiver training or you’re looking for a caregiver or CNA job, you can find free resources at myCNAjobs.com.

Caregiver Training: Bathing A Dementia Client

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver Resources, Caregiver Training, Home Health Aide Job.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Autumn and on the team here at myCNAjobs.

We’ve been getting a lot of questions lately on tips to bath a senior that is suffering from Alzheimer’s or Dementia. So in today’s training session I’m going to share a few best practices that we’ve compiled from others in the industry.

Bathing can be one of the most difficult personal care activities that a caregiver does in their job each day.  Because bathing is so personal, it can be a hard situation for both the caregiver and the patient. I’m hoping to leave you with some new thinking to make things a little easier.

 

Tip #1: Be Empathetic

First, it’s important to put yourself in your client’s shoes. Many dementia patients are resistant to bathing as they don’t remember what bathing is for or it just makes them uncomfortable. Loss of independence can be very difficult so it’s important to approach each bath with empathy. If you encounter a senior that is angry and combative, don’t take it personally and approach the situation with kindness.

 

Tip #2: Prepare The Bath

When possible, allow your client to do as much as they can. Have them help you gather bathing supplies, hang towels, turn the heat to a comfortable temperature, and set the water temperature. The more you can prepare your client and involve them in the process, the more smoothly the process is likely to go.

 

Tip #3: Give Control To The Client

You can provide comfort to your patient by helping them have some control in the process. Ask them things like

  • Do you prefer to take a bath now or in 15 minutes?
  • Do you prefer 4 inches of water or 5?
  • Do you prefer this shampoo or that shampoo?

The more you power you can give to the patient, the more buy in you’ll get in the process making it easier to complete a successful bath.

 

Tip #4: Control Agitation

If the patient becomes agitated, have music ready to play or a song ready to sing. Talk about a topic that is known to make the patient smile or calm down. These are great things to talk about with the patient’s family. With some memory loss patients, removing the mirrors in the bathroom can be helpful as it makes the experience feel more private.

 

Tip #5: Be Gentle & Coach

When possible, have the client wash where they can. Help coach the client on what and where to clean, guiding them through the process. Talk through the areas that you’re going to clean so there are no surprises.  Be gentle in your touch and if the client becomes agitated, stop for a moment to control the agitation before continuing.

Tip #6: Document Care

After the bath, check for rashes and sores as you help get your client dressed. After helping the senior get comfortable, document the bath including things like how the senior did, concerns you have, and if you found anything unusual. If you’re working for a home care agency, you’ll often have formal documentation to complete after each bath to provide to your employer and the client’s family. After your documentation is complete, go have fun! Bathing can be stressful so try to find an activity that is soothing to your client to help them transition.

 

Well, that’s it folks. Best of luck and I hope this video was helpful. If you like what you saw here and you’d like to access more caregiver training or you’re looking for a caregiver or CNA job, you can find free resources at myCNAjobs.com.

Caregiver Training: Homecare Caregiver Duties

Posted by & filed under Become a Caregiver or CNA, Caregiver Job Tip, Caregiver Training.

 

Hi there and welcome to our career training series. I’m Ruby and I’m one of the recruiters here at myCNAjobs.

Today’s training session is to help those exploring a career as a home care caregiver to better understand what a caregiver is, a day in the life of a caregiver, and typical caregiver job duties.

There’s never been a better time to explore a career in home care. This is one of the fastest growing professions in America. Our Baby Boomers are aging and more seniors want to age in their home. This means they need caregivers to help care for them.

If you have a caring heart and like caring for other people, being a caregiver can be a very rewarding career to earn a living AND make a difference in the world.

So, let’s dive in. Today we’re going to talk about

  • What a home care caregiver is
  • What caregivers do
  • How much caregivers make
  • How to become a caregiver
  • How to find a caregiver job

 

What Is A Homecare Caregiver?

A caregiver that works in a home care setting helps seniors age in place and provide comfort to those that need care.  Caregivers may work under the supervision of a RN or LPN to provide care according to a patient’s care plan.  People that have a love for caring for others, have experience babysitting, or caring for friends and family tend to make great caregivers. If this is you, keep watching!

 

Where Do Homecare Caregivers Work?

Homecare caregivers work directly in the home of someone needing care. Many caregivers work directly for a homecare agency.  The agency helps connect caregivers to people in the local community that need care, manages payroll, scheduling, and overall career development path for a caregiver. Many agencies have job openings for caregivers without any experience as they are willing to train the right people on-the-job. If you want to explore local home care agencies in your area, visit myCNAjobs.com and click on JOBS. You can enter your zip code and search agencies closest to you to get an idea of the opportunities closest to you.

 

What Do Homecare Caregivers Do?

Homecare caregivers provide one-on-one care to a senior, disabled, or other types of individuals that need short or long term care in their home. Sometimes a patient will just have one caregiver and sometimes a patient may have a few caregivers if they require around the clock care. Here are a few caregiver duties.

  1. Help people with BLS – that means basic living activities.   These are things like getting around the house, eating a meal, brushing teeth, going to the bathroom, bathing, combing hair, and staying active. One of the most fun parts of a home care job is getting to know your clients — hearing their stories, taking them to bingo, and joining them in the world for fun activities!
  2. Document your care.  Depending on the patient you’re working with, you may or may not have a care plan. If you do have a care plan, this will be your guide of what you should do on any given day with your patient. All caregivers typically report on any health condition changes to let your company or the patient’s family know what happened that day.
  1. Maintain a tidy environment. An important part of a home care job is helping your patients maintain a tidy living space. It’s helpful to the patient and their loved ones if you can help with common chores like making beds, sweeping the floor, and cleaning out the fridge. It’s tough for those that are old and sick to do these things so often it’s part of how a caregiver can help provide great care for their patient.
  2. Help your clients get around. Some patients need help getting in and out of a wheelchair, to be taken to the salon to get their hair done, or driven to a doctor’s appointment. Caregivers helps their patients get to where they need to go. Sometimes this means that caregivers drive a client in their own care, sometimes in a client’s care, and sometimes it may mean accompanying them in a rideshare program like uber. The amount and type of transportation you will do will depend on your specific clients.

 

How Much Do Caregivers Make?

Pay for home care caregiver jobs varies based on your experience, where you live, and where you work.   Typically, pay ranges from $9 per hour to $17 per hour.  Some companies offer live-in caregiver jobs that allow you to work a few days and earn a full salary.  For live-in jobs, we see companies paying $1,000 – $1,300 per week.  If you want to learn more about what companies are paying in your area, search jobs at myCNAjobs.com. You can enter your zip code and then see specific companies and pay rates. Our prediction is that caregiver wages will start to increase even more as the demand for certified nursing assistants increases. Also, if you decide to get your CNA license, you typically earn a couple of dollars more per hour.

 

How Do You Become A Home Caregiver?

To get started, you need to connect with local home care agencies. Each agency is unique and will have different requirements. If you don’t have experience, most agencies provide on-the-job training to help you learn basic skills. We’ve also seen agencies create job shadow programs to allow you to get familiar with what the job is and how you can become excellent at it. Additionally, you can take free caregiver courses online at myCNAjobs.com. After you complete the course, you’ll get a certificate to print to bring to an employer to show them all of the new skills you’re learning.

 

How Do You Find A Caregiver Job?

This one is easy. Look online and get out in your community! Chances are good that there are at least a dozen agencies in your backyard. We have a directory you can use at myCNAjobs as well.  Visit myCNAjobs.com to search companies by zip code.  You can also just call our recruitment team and ask — we can share more about current openings in your area and potentially book you for an interview!   Our recruitment number is 312-275-3959.

 

Well, that’s it folks. If you like what you saw here today, there are more training videos and free resources available at myCNAjobs.com.

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